Arlington Government Channel ACMi

Wide Angle is a weekly interview show featuring guest authors and activists from the Arlington community and beyond. While we hope to give context to stories you might hear on the news, Wide Angle is by no means a “news show.” And although we explore issues from a political angle on occasion, neither are we a “political show.”

Instead, Wide Angle aspires to offer a quiet place to explore the big ideas not often addressed by our mainstream media: incarceration and income inequality, war and military recruitment, race and Israel/Palestine, as well as issues that underscore our common humanity, such as food, grief and hospice. And we endeavor to leave viewers of every episode with at least two things: energy borne of frustration or illumination, anger or hope, as well as the resources to pursue action and make change.

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Wide Angle: Episode 13 – Spatializing Blackness

Wide Angle: Episode 13 – Spatializing Blackness

Joining Peter to discuss such questions of geography is Prof. Rashad Shabazz, associate professor at Arizona State University and author of the book, Spatializing Blackness: Architectures of Confinement and Black Masculinity in Chicago.

Wide Angle: Episode 11 – Teaching Race

Wide Angle: Episode 11 – Teaching Race

It is clear that our children are inheriting a world very different from the one we older generations came of age in. And while it’s easy to dwell on the serious problems that we’ve handed them, our children fortunately have the benefit of growing up in a richer, more diverse global culture that we could ever have imagined. That gift, however, comes with an inherited set of challenges of its own.

Wide Angle: Episode 10 – Food Sovereignty

Wide Angle: Episode 10 – Food Sovereignty

In 1930, Mahatma Gandhi and a handful of supporters marched some 240 miles to the sea to “make salt.” That is to say, they gathered up and thereby claimed that life-sustaining mineral as their birth right, not a commodity controlled exclusively by their British colonizers. For that act of civil disobedience, those Indian Salt Marchers–and the tens of thousands who soon joined them–were arrested en masse.