Small But Mighty: Kids Change the World – Episode 1

Since 2016 the Thompson elementary school has been leading zero waste campaigns. Their first campaign inspired their school district to switch from Styrofoam school cafeteria trays to compostable trays and adopt industrial composting systems reducing lunchtime waste by 97%. In this first episode of Small But Mighty Kids Change The World, Maanik, Eli and Mia discuss the harmful impacts of plastic and Styrofoam pollution and food waste that inspired them into action. With the story of their green team these 5th graders seek to inspire other students to run their own zero waste campaigns in their school districts and towns. This podcast was created by Maanik, Eli, Mia, Quinn, Teddy and Ana with the help of Green Team mom, Elizabeth, and ACMi youth mentor, Kevin.

This video was created in coordination with Arlington Community Media, Inc. in Arlington, MA. ACMi is dedicated to providing an electronic forum for the free exchange of information and ideas which reflect the talents, skills, interests, concerns, and diversity of the Arlington, Massachusetts community.

To find out more visit https://www.acmi.tv

Small But Mighty: Kids Change the World – Episode 2 – Bash the Trash Interview

The Thompson Green Team 5th graders interviewed Rohin Khemani from Bash the Trash (BTT) when they came to their elementary school. For 30 years BTT has been transforming trash into musical instruments and science, music and environmental education in elementary and middle schools. The podcast features 10 5th graders including Eli, the host, and Maanik, Mia, Leah, Caroline, Lilia, Abby, Indigo, Emma and Gael interviewing Rohin who has worked at BTT for 15 years. 5th grader, Teddy, filmed the BTT interview. Mia edited this podcast episode with the help of ACMi youth mentor, Kevin, and Green Team mom, Elizabeth, who has been learning right along side the other students.

www.bashthetrash.com

This video was created in coordination with Arlington Community Media, Inc. in Arlington, MA. ACMi is dedicated to providing an electronic forum for the free exchange of information and ideas which reflect the talents, skills, interests, concerns, and diversity of the Arlington, Massachusetts community.

To find out more visit https://www.acmi.tv

Small But Mighty: Kids Change the World – Episode 3 – Bash the Trash

Thompson Green Team 5th grader, Mia, recounts activities involving a 3 day Bash The Trash (BTT) program at Thompson Elementary school. BTT has been transforming trash into musical instruments and science, music and environmental education for 30 years. With help from 2nd grader, Ana, Mia describes how the 4th and 2nd graders got the school excited and ready for BTT. Principal Karen Donato is also heard introducing the 2nd grader ecosystem super heroes who rally their classmate to “Don’t Make Trash” on super hero day. Mia then describes the BTT assembly, classroom workshops and the parade showcasing the trash instruments of BTT, 5th grader, Gregory, and 2nd graders, Samara, Louise and Ana.
5th grader, Teddy, filmed the podcast with help from Green Team moms, Elizabeth and Fiona. Thanks to ACMi youth mentor, Kevin Wetmore!

This video was created in coordination with Arlington Community Media, Inc. in Arlington, MA. ACMi is dedicated to providing an electronic forum for the free exchange of information and ideas which reflect the talents, skills, interests, concerns, and diversity of the Arlington, Massachusetts community.

To find out more visit https://www.acmi.tv

ACMi Sports Update: April 19, 2019

The Spy Ponders are gearing-up for the spring season. And we have an exclusive interview with Stanley Vieira, Arlington High’s athletic director. We get his thoughts about his new job and what he wants for the future of Spy Ponder sports.

Recreational Cannabis Consideration

As you know, Arlington already has a medical marijuana dispensary in town. And like many other cities and towns nationwide, Arlington is considering legal sales of recreational cannabis.

But there seems to be conflicting information about how that’s worked elsewhere. Some experts say there are still red flags to consider.